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HOODY

with

Arthur Aviles
and
Robert
La Fosse

DANCES
WITH
WOLVES

with

Keely
Garfield

PROGRAM

Dances With Wolves (2001)
Choreographed by Lawrence Goldhuber
Performed by Keely Garfield and Lawrence Goldhuber
Music by Esquivel, Astaire, Khachaturian, Aretha, Elvis
Lighting Design by Robert Wierzel
This work was commissioned by Performance Space 122 with funds from The Jerome Foundation. It was also made possible by a generous space grant from the 92nd Street Y-Harkness Dance Program.

Film: The Life and Times of Barry Goldhubris (7 minute excerpt)  (2003)
Written and directed by David Brooks and Lawrence Goldhuber
This work was co-commissioned by The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA), by the Joyce Theater's Stephen and Cathy Weinroth Fund for New Work, and by Performance Space 122 with funds from the Jerome Foundation.

A Match Made in Heaven  (Premiere)
Choreographed and performed by Lawrence Goldhuber and Wallie Wolfgruber
Music by Igor Stravinsky
Costumes by Sandra Cain
Props by Claire Leffel and Gregory L.Bain
Lighting Design by Robert Wierzel
An earlier version of A Match Made in Heaven was performed at SUNY-Brockport.


A MATCH
MADE IN
HEAVEN

with

Wallie
Wolfgruber

HOODY  (Premiere)
Choreographed by Lawrence Goldhuber
Performed by Arthur Aviles, Keely Garfield, Robert LaFosse, and Wallie  Wolfgruber
Film by Janet Wong
Music by Jorge Reyes, Ladji Camara, DJ Reality, Dudu Tucci, Patato
Costumes provided by DIESEL
Lighting Design by Robert Wierzel
Hoody was commissioned by the Creative Residency Program of Dance Theater Workshop with support from the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. This presentation is made possible, in part, by the generous support of Judy and Steven Gluckstern through the David R. White Producers Circle.

Seven Deadly Sins: Gluttony (New York Premiere)
Choreographed by Lawrence Goldhuber
Performed by Arthur Aviles, Jamie Bishton, Keely Garfield, Lawrence Goldhuber,
  Robert La Fosse, David Parker, and Wallie Wolfgruber
Music by Mark Mothersbaugh, Yello
Costumes by Liz Prince
Lighting Design by Robert Wierzel
Gluttony was commissioned by the Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival.

HOODY

with

Arthur
Aviles
and
Robert
La Fosse

SEVEN
DEADLY
SINS:
GLUTTONY


with

Robert
La Fosse

who can say?

MORE
GLUTTONY

with (l to r)

Robert
La Fosse.
Wallie
Wolfgruber,
David
Parker,
Keely
Garfield,
Arthur
Aviles.
Jamie
Bishton

Major support for this evening was provided by The Jerome Foundation, MN.

BIGMANARTS has received generous continued funding grants from both
The Bossak/Heilbron Charitable Foundation and The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

BIGMANARTS at DTW is made possible in part with public funds from the Manhattan Community Arts Fund supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and administered by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. 

 This evening was made possible by the generous donations of the following people:
Bjorn Amelan & Bill T. Jones, Dr. & Mrs. Paul Cohen, John & Sage Cowles, Sean Curran, Eleanor Danziger, Edward & Susan Gitkind, Jerry Goldhuber & Diane Storin, Stephanie Goldhuber, Sara Gordon, Jeff Goria, Bruce Imber & Jobert Abueva, C Jadusingh & M. Hyde, Paul King & Walter Jaffe, Doris Klapper, Norton Klotz, Julie Landman, Claire Leffel, Janet Lilly & Mark Steele, Lolita Leshiem & Matthew Panschar, Ray & Fran Osinoff, Susan & Shelly Osinoff, Nicolas Ramirez, Jeanette Resnick, Nathan & Bunny Ritzer, Kevin Scherer & Sharel Vice, Bea Scherer, Benedicta Schwager, Sidney Schwager, Jack Sparrow, Anita Tierney, Laurie Uprichard, Valeria Vasilevski & Phillip Trimble, Karen & David Waltuck, Micki Wesson, and Tony Wicks.  Many thanks to you all.

Costumes for HOODY generously provided by DIESEL

Special Thanks to:  To the crew and administration at DTW, Marion Dienstag and Cathy Edwards, Ellen Jacobs, Bruce Imber/Monkey Hill, Guia Golden at Diesel, Heidi Latsky and Stephen Jones, Claire Leffel, Janet Wong, Robert Wierzel, Nicolas Ramirez, Josh Gosfield, Tony Wicks, and of course, the wonderful cast.






















Lawrence Goldhuber and Keely Garfield in "Dances With Wolves."           
G. Paul Burnett/The New York Times


Lawrence Goldhuber has made a career of defying expectations. He weighs, by varying reports, 300 to 350 pounds, unusual, to say the least, for a dancer. But Mr. Goldhuber had a memorable nine-year career with Bill T. Jones's company before establishing a reputation as a witty, touching dance-maker.

...His latest program, which opened at Dance Theater Workshop on Wednesday night, does little more than confirm that Mr. Goldhuber has a sure theatrical sense of how to be funny about himself and his size, and a gift for making others look funny too.

The most skillful choreography comes from an older piece, "Dances With Wolves" (2001), which sets Mr. Goldhuber and Keely Garfield in a deadpan fox-trotting routine that is part Fred and Ginger, part domestic mayhem.

...To the many dances choreographed to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring," Mr. Goldhuber and Wallie Wolfgruber have added "A Match Made in Heaven," an amusing but ultimately unsatisfying account of Adam-and-Eve-go-to-the-big-city that never transcends its cartoon air of fun.

The city also appears in a handsome film by Janet Wong that serves as a backdrop to "Hoody," an urban retelling of "Little Red Riding Hood." Set to a steady, percussive beat, the work stars Arthur Aviles as an all too believably hyperkinetic child and perfectly casts the handsome Robert La Fosse as a sleazy wolf. But neither here nor in the final piece, "Seven Deadly Sins: Gluttony," is there much going on except enjoyable romping about.  The dancers, who include Jamie Bishton, are downtown royalty and Mr. La Fosse, a former New York City Ballet principal, is an uptown prince...

By Roslyn Sulcas
Published May 19, 2007

HOODY

with

Arthur
Aviles

HOODY

with

Wallie
Wolfgruber
and
Robert
La Fosse

HOODY

with

Arthur
Aviles
and
Keely
Garfield






Lawrence Goldhuber and Wallie Wolfgruber in
"A Match Made in Heaven" Photo by Julieta Cervantes

BIGMANARTS Hits the Broad Side of the Barn
Lawrence Goldhuber's latest company tells tales with physical humor

By QUINN BATSON

 ...Lawrence Goldhuber/BIGMANARTS consistently entertained in his coyly obvious big-guns style at the company's DTW premiere. Goldhuber and the members of this current company are all well-seasoned performers whose professional dance careers extend back as far as 30 years, and his mockumentary calls on more longtime NYC dance figures as interviewees. All these stellar pedigrees give the performance a very even keel, even as the events onstage become calculatedly ridiculous, and these people still move better than quite a few dancers 20 years younger.

 "Dances with Wolves" is a ballroom dance in formal dress that explores the pitfalls of doomed relationships in moments of elegance and abject rejection. Keely Garfield, Goldhuber's slender feminine counterpart, does most of the rejecting, keeping it cool when she isn't struggling violently. It's a well-crafted piece that fits the performers well, full of trademark bits like Goldhuber doing very roughly the same leaps as his much lither partner or carting her around over his shoulder like a lively sack of flour. The humor relies on his oblivious but endearing character, the oaf with a heart of gold, much like a Laurel and Hardy comedy and with similar laughs...

   The very witty take on Adam and Eve and the Garden of Eden "A Match Made in Heaven" then pairs the lovely Wallie Wolfgruber with Goldhuber, both wearing hilarious nude bodysuits (see picture). There is nothing remotely subtle in this piece, which makes it all the better. The obviously fake 12-foot snake and enormous candy-red apple lead the hapless couple to the sin of the big city and ultimately a fatal struggle over a rifle. Wolfgruber is such a pleasure to watch move, another excellent foil to Goldhuber's limited physicality.

 "Hoody" showcases the exuberant dancing of Arthur Aviles, cast as a male Red Riding Hood from the 'hood who meets the suave wolf Robert LaFosse on the way to his aunt's house, sent on a mission by his mom, Keely Garfield in high heels and hair with a cellphone implant and a New York accent big enough to hear without sound. A narrated video backdrop by Janet Wong works really well to move the story along with simple props and visuals.

 Dessert comes in the lush food dream of a fat-suited Goldhuber that is "Seven Deadly Sins: Gluttony," another exercise in vaudevillian humor that completely hits its barn-sized target. Robert La Fosse's hot dog character is the most fun, but everyone has a good time in this finale of dancing food, which also includes a pair of lumpy chicken nuggets and a glittering trio of Hershey's Kisses doing rhythmic gymnast routines with their ribbons.

 Gluttony is probably the best word to describe the entire evening, with physical humor standing in for food.

A MATCH
MADE IN
HEAVEN

with

Wallie
Wolfgruber

Adam
takes aim
at EVIL








LAWRENCE GOLDHUBER/BIGMANARTS
By Celia Ipiotis

No doubt about it, the grande sized dancer, Lawrence Goldhuber knows how to construct a succinct piece all juiced up with humor and clever nuances.

With a background in theater as well as dance, Goldhuber's cast is a sly combination of dancers with distinct personalities and shared sense of theatricality.

At Dance Theater Workshop May 16 - 19, Goldhuber and his all-star company BIGMANARTS presented the world premiere of "Hoody" (think Little Red---) and the New York premieres of "7 Deadly Sins: Gluttony" and "A Match Made In Heaven" plus "Dances With Wolves", the "Fred and Ginger" gone askew duet with Keely Garfield. Clueless looks and kooky smiles make the sinewy Garfield a terrific foil to the seemingly debonair, "light on his feet" Goldhuber.

The world premiere "Hoody" gave the "The Little Red Riding Hood" fairytale an urban twist and ethnic charge, featuring the always show-stopping Arthur Aviles along with a deliriously funny Jamie Bishton plus Robert la Fosse, David Parker, Wallie Wolfgruber and Garfield.

But by far, the show that took the hotdog, was "Gluttony." Dancing food vies with colorful appetites generating a carnival of fun.

Gluttony
with

Wallie
Wolfgruber

Keely
Garfield

Jamie
Bishton

DANCES
WITH
WOLVES

with

Keely
Garfield

TIME OUT
NEW YORK

full page
preview





















But who
wrote this
copy???






PHOTO: MIKE VAN SLEEN



KISSES: MOLLY HICKOCK, REBECCA WISOCKY, AND JAMIE BISHTON

PHOTO: ALAN E. SOLOMON



PHOTO: ALAN E. SOLOMON



REHEARSAL PHOTO: NICOLE BENGIVINO



"Dancing Hershey Kisses, brilliantly costumed by Liz Prince, were a high point of the afternoon in Lawrence Goldhuber's "Gluttony," set to music by Mark Mothersbaugh and Yello. Their giddy bourrées and Chinese ribbon dancing were brilliantly conceived by Mr. Goldhuber, who, dressed in a fat suit, fell asleep at a picnic and dreamed of a priapic hot- dog and two nuzzling drumsticks."

Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times


"A piece works best when the sin emerges in all its dread glory. The already tubby Goldhuber tackles "Gluttony" in a fat suit, giving love of food a gleefully erotic edge. His post-picnic dream features a lewd frankfurter, who's hurt when he catches Goldhuber in flagrante delicto with two drumsticks. Liz Prince's costumes for three chocolate kisses are particularly tasty."

Deborah Jowitt, Village Voice


"The two fantasy sins, Lawrence Goldhuber’s Gluttony and Annie-B Parson’s Greed, seemed the most imaginative. Goldhuber, padded to twice his usual volume, trots on with a picnic basket and wolfs down some of the contents, then stretches out for a nap. The lunch comes to life (Bishton, Hickok and Rebecca Wisocky as Hershey’s Kisses, twirling blue ribbons, were my favorites) and eventually eats Goldhuber."

Marcia B. Siegal, The Boston Phoenix


"Former Bill T. Jones favorite Lawrence Goldhuber created a hilarious "Gluttony." Padding his massive frame with so much stuffing he looked inflated, Goldhuber was a gleeful picnicker whose post-meal dreams were invaded by oversize versions of the foods he had just eaten. Robert La Fosse was a riot as a dancing hot dog, the lower half of which fell out of the bun to dangle between his legs like an enormous sexual appendage."

Karen Campbell, The Boston Globe


"Lawrence Goldhuber, against the advice of his friends, chose gluttony (the choreographer and dancer weighs more than 300 pounds). "Gluttony," he says matter-of-factly, "is the sin I can access most easily." Goldhuber's Gluttony features three sections. In the first, he dances with a picnic basket. "I fall asleep, and there's a dream sequence in which all the things that I ate come back to haunt me." Liz Prince designed costumes resembling Hershey's Kisses, chicken legs and a hot dog. "The hot dog has a kind of phallic, sexy-sinister quality," Goldhuber says. "It's more like a betrayed lover. My piece ends with death—the hot dog pulls my heart out. It's so goofy, but it's fast and funny."

Gia Kourlas, Time Out New York


"Meeting several months ago to select their sins, the choreographers managed to divide them up amicably. "Larry was amazing; he came in with ideas for every sin," Mr. Walker said. Mr. Goldhuber, a large man who first gained acclaim as a dancer with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company and now creates his own works, said, "I was drawn to `Gluttony.' " He brings the sin to the stage as a dream ballet with a twist: "The introduction is me in a fat suit having a picnic by myself before I fall asleep and dream that all the things I have eaten come to life," he said. With the aid of the costume designer Liz Prince, he turns six dancers into Hershey's Kisses, chicken legs and a hot dog. "I see my section as being very theatrical," he said. "The mood and ideas are more important than the actual steps."

Susan Reiter, The New York Times





GO SIN SOME MORE


Religious ultra-conservatives see dancing as a sin. The fact that dance so ebulliently lends itself to the depiction of sin may fuel their mistrust. Dances about sin sin doubly, I suspect; they not only get choreographers' creative juices flowing, they lure people to decadent spots like Jacob's Pillow. The Seven Deadly Sins, a hit with audiences at the Pillow, was dreamed up by Robert La Fosse of the New York City Ballet and Chet Walker of Broadway fame, who doled out the major transgressions to seven extremely diverse choreographers and allotted them 10 minutes apiece to outrage heaven. Unsurprisingly, none of those given this juicy opportunity—La Fosse, Walker, David Dorfman, Lawrence Goldhuber, Richard Move, Jamie Bishton, and Annie-B Parson—wag particularly admonishing fingers. "So take a look at this sin," each seems to say. "Is there a problem here?"

The performers range from virtuosos like the vibrant young Rasta Thomas, who explodes into spins and leaps at the drop of a plié, to the marvelously kooky actress-dancer Rebecca Wisocky from Parson's Big Dance Theater. A piece works best when the sin emerges in all its dread glory. The already tubby Goldhuber tackles "Gluttony" in a fat suit, giving love of food a gleefully erotic edge. His post-picnic dream features a lewd frankfurter, who's hurt when he catches Goldhuber in flagrante delicto with two drumsticks. Liz Prince's costumes for three chocolate kisses are particularly tasty. The darkest, yet unjudgmental, view comes from Move, who expresses "Lust" through a mesmerizingly hermetic, self-absorbed solo for Helène Alexopoulos. Wearing a gleaming black bobbed wig, caged in a spotlight on the floor (lighting design by Tom Sturge), she coils and uncoils her long, slender body into extreme mating positions with almost creepy slowness, her occasional shudder or silent scream suggesting she's trapped in her own erotic performance, a phenomenon for two paparazzi to rush in and snap.

Parson is the only choreographer who nods to the Brecht-Weill Seven Deadly Sins, even though most of her music is by John Zorn. Molly Hickock sings a Weill song, and all five women (Hickock, Wisocky, Tymberly Canale, Kate Johnson, and Krissy Richmond) in Parson's terrifically bizarre and witty "Greed" spout German and squeaky Teutonic gibberish. Inhabiting what appears, via lights and Claudia Stephens's out-of-date dresses, to be a moldering mansion, they covet whatever interesting object they come upon (gloves! red shoes! Oh my God, a white umbrella—I must have it!).

Dorfman sees "Sloth" as purposeless activity that diverts people from their true work. Bishton and Paul Matteson compliment each other on their skill at doing nothing. (Hickock and Wisocky join them in this witty talking-dancing work.) Bishton, drawing music from cello suites by Bach and Britten, attempts to show "Envy" through formal patterns and shifting tensions that destroy the harmony of a circle. A pirouette competition escalates into sparring. Stephanie Liapis is ousted and squabbled over. "Envy," though full of interesting movement, doesn't seem fully shaped yet. Walker's "Anger" looks more like a display of aggressive pride and showy steps by Alexopoulos, La Fosse, Thomas, and Desmond Richardson; and La Fosse consigns Pride to the finale, a runway strut in which all, garbed in gold by Karl Lucifeld, get to parade their dream roles. A sin? Spiritual death? Hel-lo?


PHOTO: MIKE VAN SLEEN








The premise of the latest evening-length work at Jacob's Pillow is very Real World. Take seven choreographers, put them in the same (theatrical) house and give them each a different sin. In this case, however, 12 incredible dancers, including Heléne Alexopoulos, Kate Johnson, Desmond Richardson and Krissy Richmond, are costars. The first Seven Deadly Sins, choreographed by George Balanchine in 1933 and revived in 1958 for Allegra Kent, features music by Kurt Weill. But in the updated version, which premieres at Jacob's Pillow Tuesday 10, little but the title resembles the original.

Although Robert La Fosse, a longtime principal with the New York City Ballet, originally conceived the project and has created its fashion show­like finale, Pride, he insists that the choreographers involved in the new version—David Dorfman (Sloth), Chet Walker (Anger), Lawrence Goldhuber (Gluttony), Richard Move (Lust), Jamie Bishton (Envy) and Annie-B Parson (Greed)—are all equal partners, even down to stage time (ten minutes apiece).

"I've always been fascinated to see what Balanchine did with the Kurt Weill, but I don't think it will ever be revived," La Fosse says. "Allegra doesn't remember a step, and there's no record of it other than photographs. So I've always wanted to do something with the sins, but I wanted each one to have a completely different feeling. What we've assembled is a crossbreed of choreographic styles. I think it's more interesting to see seven different choreographers. And I'm getting to know new people. I didn't know Larry Goldhuber, and we've become, like, best friends." Each choreographer chose his respective sin. For Lust, which Richard Move terms dramatically "the most pertinent to all of our lives," the choreographer has created a surreal landscape that is both voyeuristic and remote for the gorgeous NYCB principal Heléne Alexopoulos. Judging by her dazed expression at a recent rehearsal, Move's lustful world is a foreign one. In one slow-motion section, Move transforms her into a bird. Standing in relevé (barefoot even!), her feet in fourth position, she pitches her head and torso slightly forward with her elbows hyperextended—any ballerina's nightmare—behind her back. "It's kind of bizarre," Move exclaims joyously, walking around her body, fine-tuning a wrist here and an elbow there. Tentatively, he voices a most crucial correction—that she should close her graceful City Ballet fingers.

"I'm sorry, Mr. B," Alexopoulos announces to the ceiling with a shudder. But it works; instantly, she becomes Move's creepy vision of lust. "We live in this society where we're bombarded with sex every second, whether it's on the side of a bus, a billboard or in a film," Move says. "We all have to figure out a way to cope with it and process it. That's one of the reasons I thought it should be a solo. I perceive lust as this element that we have, in a very personal way, to come to terms with. It's really about how a woman copes with both being an object of desire and with desire itself."

The score for Lust ranges from phone-sex ads to sound bites from the '50s about what women should wear, and ends with fast techno dance music. But, for Alexopoulos, the sound score alone doesn't constitute the biggest change. "She's never done anything like this," Move says. "There are no tricks. There is not one ballet step. She's not even meant to look out at the audience or project, but she's going to be able to pull it off because the solo is about an intensity of focus, which takes an experienced performer."

Suppressed rage is Broadway choreographer Chet Walker's sin of choice; his section, Anger, is set to music by Astor Piazzola. David Dorfman incorporates his trademark floor work into Sloth, featuring music by Seattle composer Amy Denio. And Lawrence Goldhuber, against the advice of his friends, chose gluttony (the choreographer and dancer weighs more than 300 pounds). "Gluttony," he says matter-of-factly, "is the sin I can access most easily."

Goldhuber's Gluttony features three sections. In the first, he dances with a picnic basket. "I fall asleep, and there's a dream sequence in which all the things that I ate come back to haunt me." Liz Prince designed costumes resembling Hershey's Kisses, chicken legs and a hot dog. "The hot dog has a kind of phallic, sexy-sinister quality," Goldhuber says. "It's more like a betrayed lover. My piece ends with death—the hot dog pulls my heart out. It's so goofy, but it's fast and funny."

Jamie Bishton, a dancer in Gluttony, Sloth and Pride, has also created Envy. He bases the piece on recent experiences as an actor and as Patrick Swayze's dance double in the forthcoming film Without a Word. "Both Rasta Thomas and Desmond Richardson, who are in my piece, worked on the movie," Bishton says. "Just watching Rasta, who's this young, incredible talent, and Desmond, a mature artist, bounce off of each other made me realize that there was this whole envy thing between them." Envy,which highlights their competitive nature, is set to cello solos by Bach and Benjamin Britten. To Bishton, "the cello is the instrument most like a voice, and envy is all about your voice." As it happens, dance-theater choreographer Annie-B Parson—whose section is Greed—is the only artist using music by Kurt Weill.

"I thought it would be fun to reference The Seven Deadly Sins, although the song isn't from it," she says. "It's a greedy song about interest-bearing bonds—like how to accrue interest on your money. I'm also using a little John Zorn."

All the sins are over-the-top, but as Parson, the director of the acclaimed Big Dance Theater, sees it, greed has even greater theatrical possibilities. "In my piece, greed is more like a slippery slope, but it's actually really bright and funny," she says. "It's not dark. The greedy are just so alive."

As with all of the choreographers, the project has gotten Parson analyzing her own sins. "The sins start to blur a bit when you think about them too much," she says, laughing. "Greed goes to envy, envy goes to lust—and I'm guilty of all of them, except for gluttony, but I'm sure I'll hit it at some point." The Seven Deadly Sins is at Jacob's Pillow Tuesday 10 through Sunday 15.    Issue No. 302 July 5-12, 2000 





Dancemakers Put New Spin On `Sins

Nov, 2001, by Wendy Perron

The new conglomerate version of George Balanchine's The Seven Deadly Sins, masterminded by New York City Ballet principal Robert La Fosse and Broadway choreographer Chet Walker, gathered seven diverse choreographers (one sin for each)--Lawrence Goldhuber, Jamie Bishton, Chet Walker, David Dorfman, Robert La Fosse, Richard Move, and Annie-B Parson--and twelve versatile dancers. The result was an ingenious celebration of bad behavior that was rarely sinister.

For this reviewer, the highlight was "Greed." Choreographed by Annie-B Parson (co-director of Big Dance Theatre) and featuring Molly Hickok (also of Big Dance) as chief sinner, it was hilarious and insightful. Parson set her ten-minute allotment vaguely in Germany--she used an old recording of a Kurt Weill orchestration--and attached greed to privilege. Surrounded by four women who were perhaps handmaidens, perhaps other society ladies, Hickok went giddy over a pair of red shoes, yelling "Meine Schuhe!" (German for "my shoes") and staggering after Kate Johnson, who was wearing them. We ached with laughter over the progression of her greed, recognizing how greed begets greed, how once you step onto that escalator of materialism, it's hard to step off. By the time Hickok spotted a white parasol that she had to have, she was a raving lunatic--and we all knew the feeling. At the end, her subordinate, Rebecca Wisocky, was left admiring the parasol, purring with a budding greed of her own. One of the horrors--and allures--of sin is its contagiousness.

"Sloth" gave downtown choreographer David Dorfman a chance to slow down. He luxuriated in loose-limbed movement and sly verbal wit. Paul Matteson rolled over another dancer, triggering a conversation about how to do nothing well. Matteson danced with such buoyancy and release that you could feel your lungs expand while watching him. A wonderful moment came when Matteson and Jamie Bishton faced the audience blankly, held a stillness, and then talked about how great it was.

The color red figured prominently in Walker's "Anger." The dancers posed indignantly and strutted with an attractive pent-up wrath to Astor Piazzolla's tangy tangos. When Desmond Richardson flared a red cloth like a toreador, he looked gloriously sexy, but neither he nor any of the other dancers ever burst into real rage. Walker's "Anger" remained a somewhat decorative sin.

Lawrence Goldhuber, the large dancer who cut an unforgettable figure with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, brought a mischievous innocence to "Gluttony." Padded to look even heftier than he is, he carried a picnic basket, stuffed a hot dog down his throat, gurgled a soda and, completely sated, rolled over for a nap. He dreamed of the basket rising to heaven. He dreamed of a hot dog, drumsticks, and chocolate kisses becoming human size, with La Fosse as a rather lewd hot dog (costumes by Liz Prince). All the foodstuffs fought over him, wrecking his gluttony heaven.

"Envy," fashioned by Bishton, the novice choreographer of the group, was a competition between Richardson and the young Rasta Thomas, who tossed off a series of amazing pirouettes. But the choreography was unremarkable.

Richard Move, of Martha@Mother fame, created "Lust" as a solo for NYCB principal Helene Alexopoulos. She curved sinuously around herself with a kind of deadly restraint. The tension mounted until she opened her mouth wide and reached her arms out, her hands fluttering crazily. A stunning solo, "Lust" offered a glimpse of psychic danger but remained highly controlled. (The music collage had a heavy beat and snatches of the voice of Anita Hill testifying. Hmmm.)

"Pride" was a parade of extravagant characters staged by La Fosse. Parting glittering drapes one at a time, a soldier, a showgirl, a macho construction worker, a cheerleader, and other archetypes of popular media entered, dressed (by Karl Lucifeld) to the hilt in hues of gold. Amid this high-spirited party of scantily clothed figures (representing vanity rather than pride to this eye), the reentrance of Goldhuber, regal in guru-type robes, brought pride down to earth with a bump. Never have I felt so relieved to see a 300-pound man on a crowded dance stage.

When Balanchine choreographed Sins in 1933 and revived it in 1958, a single ballerina committed all seven sins (Tilly Losch in '33 and Allegra Kent in '58, with Lotte Lenya singing Weill's original tunes on stage both times), which must have given the ballet a certain consistency. In the new version, one didn't miss the consistency of style--it was part of the fascination. And the dancing and performing were excellent throughout. But one might miss the consistency of choreographic interest. Basically this was an inspired idea whose execution was inconsistent. But then, inconsistency is no sin.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE WRITE: goldhuber@goldhuber.com

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