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JUST THE TWO OF US from I HATE MODERN DANCE

PHOTO: NOW MAGAZINE, TORONTO



HEAD SHOT

PHOTO: ARAGAO



IT'S NOT WHAT YOU THINK (I, II, III)

PHOTO: ARAGAO



IT'S NOT WHAT YOU THINK (I,II,III)

PHOTO: BOB SCHAEFFER






TRAVELING DUET from WORST CAST SCENARIO

PHOTO: DONA ANN MCADAMS



WORST CASE SCENARIO

PHOTO: LESLEY DILL



WORST CASE SCENARIO

PHOTOS: DONA ANN MCADAMS



WORST CASE SCENARIO

PHOTO: DONA ANN MCADAMS



WORST CASE SCENARIO

PHOTO: LESLEY DILL


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HEAD DUET

HEAD DUET

PHOTO: PAULA COURT




He is huge. She is tiny. But Goldhuber and Latsky are no longer a one-joke duo. With "I Hate Modern Dance," a suite of five full and excerpted pieces presented on Tuesday night at the Joyce Theater in the Altogether Different festival, Lawrence Goldhuber and Heidi Latsky have created a charming, funny and thought-provoking look at dance and friendship. Mr. Goldhuber weighs 300 pounds and is bald, with a Jack Bennyish slow, sly take on the world around him. Ms. Latsky weighs 100 pounds, has a crop of curls and moves like a hungry mosquito. But there are more complex subthemes.

Mr. Goldhuber and Ms. Latsky appear to be dear friends subtly drawn to each other physically. There is also a seeming element of danger. Will he have a heart attack? Will she be crushed? And their choreography offers an unusual perspective on traditional partnering.

The ways they dance together are set forth in the first two pieces, "Intro," to Mozart, and "I," to Brahms performed live by Michael Grigsby and Chris Lancaster. The vocabulary is simple. The relationship is not. They might be a comfortably long-married couple. But Ms. Latsky's grittily successful self-determination in the face of Mr. Goldhuber's immense, stolid power says much about traditional differences between men and women.

Two chilling solos are at the heart of "Hate," danced to music by John Oswald, Marty Beller and Andrew Poppy. Each dancer is trapped by confining costume elements but continues to move the same way once those elements are shed. Mr. Goldhuber's solo might have been choreographed by Beckett. The dancers' interest in design is suggested in "Modern," a new black-and-white film by Gretchen Bender to music by Joe Jackson, that stylishly depicts a duet for two heads as sensual as conventionally erotic body parts.

"Dance" brings the evening to an end on a tender, funny note with ballroom sequences set to popular scores and music by Vernon Reid. Nothing is quite as it seems throughout the evening. Here Mr. Goldhuber and Ms. Latsky are joined by puppet doubles that enable them to address everything from impossibly high-flying lifts to everyday love affairs.

Robert Wierzel designed the lighting. The program will be repeated on Saturday night and Sunday afternoon at the Joyce (175 Eighth Avenue, at 19th Street in Chelsea). January 27, 2000


From THE WASHINGTON POST

PHOTO: MITSU YASUKAWA



DANCE
Review by Victoria Yoffe
Goldhuber and Latsky
The Joyce Theater
The Altogether Different Series 2000

Opposites not only attract but come together in complete harmony when Goldhuber and Latsky take the stage. The oddly matched duo, completely opposing in height and weight, achieve a perfect balance between theater and dance, able to entertain while maintaining a depth to their work that addresses identity questions and insecurities.

The title of the first work, It’s not what you think (part 1), epitomizes the success of the quirky yet powerful performances of Goldhuber and Latsky during their evening length work, I Hate Modern Dance. The piece introduces the pair as individual performers dealing with opposing stereotypes as dancers and performers. The work plays on the idea of contrast starting in the beginning of the work with Goldhuber and Latsky’s stillness while Mozart’s lyrical and powerful A Major Violin Concerto plays loudly in the background. Goldhuber often supports Latsky as her petite body jumps onto and perches off his body as well as picks up Latsky haphazardly, swinging her through the air as if a she were a doll, creating something close to a human windmill. Their movement, ranging from unusual lifts to dragging each other by the feet across the stage produced laughter and smiles from the audience while highlighting the true similarity found in difference.

In Too Much Too Little (part I) the focal point of the piece is the insecurities regarding the physical characteristics of the performers. Goldhuber appears in a costume that nearly doubles his size while Latsky stands on stage confined by her arms stretched to the ceiling by flesh toned fabric. Performing movement from a ballet vocabulary, Latsky comments on the body types society expects from a particular style and range of movement. While Latsky’s commentary comes from her movement, Goldhuber’s commentary comes from his lack of movement.

The commentary comes to a conclusion in the final piece Just the Two of Us, when mannequins resembling the performers dance with Goldhuber and Latsky, forcing them to look at and accept themselves as performers. While light hearted and clever, the work stresses that people accept themselves rather than judge themselves on the opinions and ideas of the general public.

Goldhuber and Latsky bring a new type of performance to the stage. While neither pure dance nor pure theater the merging of the two art forms creates a new and refreshing performance style that asks the audience to leave their stereotypes at the door.








The Tall and Short Of a Shifting Relationship

By ANNA KISSELGOFF

The human comedy in its broad sense is of concern to Heidi Latsky and Lawrence Goldhuber, whose wit and acuity were evident in the works they presented on Thursday night.

Formerly leading dancers in the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, they are now choreographers to watch in the future. Their creative springboard is a difference in height and weight. Ms. Latsky, a natural virtuoso, is 5 feet tall and weighs 100 pounds. Mr. Goldhuber, a quicksilver mover who can look sinister or lovable, is 6 feet tall and is said to weigh 300 pounds.

This contrast in physique became a metaphor for the ups and downs in evolving relationships: the program, entitled ''Do We Dare'' consisted of the New York premiere of ''It's Not What You Think'' and the new ''Too Much, Too Little, Too Bad!''

Commissioned by the American Dance Festival in Durham, N.C., where it will have its official premiere on July 1, ''Too Much'' shows the choreographers going beyond their Mutt-and-Jeff idea and exploring characterization with more depth. There is pain as well as humor in the two ruling images. Ms. Latsky starts off in a straitjacket of a dress, with stretched sleeves attached to the ceiling. As she turns or leaps, her body is tied up in knots. Robert Wierzel's emotional lighting captures Mr. Goldhuber in another spotlight. He sits in Liz Prince's padded birthday suit, a blob of bulbous flesh.

Each dancer is thus physically limited. Ms. Latsky's dynamism, expressed in quick footwork and mobile torso, is hemmed in. Mr. Goldhuber is all mock flesh, painfully so as he heaves his padded abdomen around or staggers about.

Deliverance comes to Ms. Latsky as her dress flies overhead and Mr. Goldhuber sheds his bodysuit. That both will again be encased in these costumes emphasizes the freedom their characters find as their inner selves. Between them stands a table with a real turkey that they carve and stuff into each other's mouths. With freedom comes temptation.

Somehow, all the precisely choreographed mayhem sits superbly with the music, Brahms's Sonata for Cello and Piano, No. 3. The same is true of Mozart's Violin Concerto, No. 5 in ''It's Not What You Think.'' Here, the duo is more obvious, playing with body type to express tender or combative moments.   April 14, 1997


TIME OUT 2000
Fashion Shoot



Subverting Hatred With Quiet Luminosity

By JENNIFER DUNNING

Lawrence Goldhuber and Heidi Latsky describe their new ''Worst Case Scenario'' as an exploration of the role that hatred plays in people's lives. Violence threads through the hourlong piece, most powerfully in combative partnering, angry solo dancing and photographic imagery of seeming hate messages printed on parts of the body. But the effect of the dance, presented by Goldhuber and Latsky on Friday night at Performance Space 122, is far more visual than visceral.

In this collaboration with Lesley Dill, a sculptor, photographer and performance artist who works with language, Mr. Goldhuber and Ms. Latsky have created a luminous world of movable scrims and gleaming white surfaces whose corridors and open spaces they scrawl through like emblems of disorder.

At one point Mr. Goldhuber, who is big, moves with uncharacteristic clumsiness in an even bigger padded beige suit imprinted with an aphorism about madness and divinity. A spectacled Ms. Dill, looking like a slightly absent-minded urban wood nymph, pulls off the top of Ms. Latsky's dress and prints on her back and then licks to a smudge the words ''I hate your soul.'' ''Worst Case Scenario'' ends with the tiny Ms. Latsky enveloped in an ornate beige dress from which Mr. Goldhuber and Ms. Dill methodically pull long ribbons of words.

''Worst Case Scenario'' is a feast for the eyes. As always, this irresistible pair offers quiet revelations about the nature of movement and of partnering and weight in dance. Underlying themes of anger and hatred mainly provide continuity to these small dances, set to instrumental and vocal music by John Oswald, Joe Jackson and others.

Ms. Dill designed the stylish, imaginative costumes and projected images, with Annie Murdock. The subtle lighting was by Robert Wierzel. Douglas Rosenberg designed the production and video montage.   April 26, 1999


Star Ledger











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